Ozzy Osbourne says he’s not interested in a Black Sabbath reunion: ‘It’s done’

The rocker's admission comes after former bandmate Tony Iommi said he's up for a reunion

Ozzy Osbourne won’t be reuniting with Black Sabbath anytime soon.

In a recent interview with Rolling Stone, the rocker responded to recent comments made by his former bandmate, Black Sabbath lead guitarist Tony Iommi, about wanting to see the band reunite after their farewell shows in 2017.

“Not for me,” the 71-year-old declared. “It’s done. The only thing I do regret is not doing the last farewell show in Birmingham with [drummer] Bill Ward. I felt really bad about that. It would have been so nice. I don’t know what the circumstances behind it were, but it would have been nice. I’ve talked to him a few times.”

“But I don’t have any of the slightest interest in [doing another gig],” added Osbourne. “Maybe Tony’s getting bored.”

While Osbourne has no interest in a reunion, he did describe his bandmates as his “brothers” when reflecting on the 50th anniversary of their self-titled album and “Paranoid.”

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This Nov. 24, 2019 file photo shows Ozzy Osbourne performing at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles. The Grammy winner and former vocalist for the metal band Black Sabbath said during an interview on 'Good Morning America' that aired Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020, that he's been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, a nervous system disorder that affects movement. The diagnosis came after a fall the previous year.

This Nov. 24, 2019 file photo shows Ozzy Osbourne performing at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles. The Grammy winner and former vocalist for the metal band Black Sabbath said during an interview on 'Good Morning America' that aired Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020, that he's been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, a nervous system disorder that affects movement. The diagnosis came after a fall the previous year. (Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

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“When they came out, I remember thinking, ‘Well, this will be all right for a few years,” he explained to the outlet. “F--king 50 years later, it’s still going. Those guys [are] my brothers, you know? They go back to my childhood. It’s more than a friendship with me and them guys; it’s a family. I don’t know any other people as long as I’ve known them.”

Osbourne shared he’s recently stayed in touch with Iommi, 72.

“He’s been really keeping me going and giving me words of encouragement,” said Osbourne. “I’ve heard from Bill once or twice. I haven’t heard much from Geezer [Butler], but that’s Geezer.”

But Osbourne admitted he’s eager to hit the road.

“I’ve got to do gigs,” he said. “I haven’t done my last gig yet. Even if it’s just to do one gig, I will do a gig. Then I’ll feel like I finished my job.”

Black Sabbath formed in 1968 and the band is still recognized as being among the pioneers of heavy metal.

Iommi revealed in May that he was open to a reunion.

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Singer Ozzy Osbourne attends the Billy Morrison - Aude Somnia Solo Exhibition at Elisabeth Weinstock on September 28, 2017, in Los Angeles, California. 

Singer Ozzy Osbourne attends the Billy Morrison - Aude Somnia Solo Exhibition at Elisabeth Weinstock on September 28, 2017, in Los Angeles, California.  (Greg Doherty/Getty Images)

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“I think that it would be good if we could do that,” Iommi told SiriusXM’s Eddie Trunk, as quoted by NME. “The hard thing is, certainly with Sabbath, because it’s such a big thing, you can’t just do an occasional show, because of the crew, and you have the whole setup. It would have to be a year or an 18-month tour… I’m not opposed to doing anything; I just would do it in a different way.”

Osbourne’s son, Jack Osbourne, recently told Fox News what he believed was the secret behind his father’s decades-long success in music.

“I think career-wise, my dad has had a meaningful pop culture impact in every decade he's been working,” explained the 34-year-old. “In the '70s, it was being in Black Sabbath and helping to define a genre. In the '80s, he was arguably the first shock rocker. And all through the ‘90s, it was helping to revitalize a genre and keep some of that rebellion. The 2000s was with 'The Osbournes.' He's had another hugely successful album this last year.”

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“I think it's the ability to pivot and grow with your audience,” he shared. “Not many artists can do that, and I think that's where the notion of being immortal comes from. We live in a society where most careers are like a flash in the pan.”